Safety razor

In the bathroom of my Great Grandmother’s House sat a traditional shaving kit. There was a mug with an old bar of shaving soap in the bottom, a badger hair brush, and a Safety Razor. My first attempt at shaving took place in that bathroom. The Safety Razor made quick work of my peach-fuzz mustache and I proudly admired my freshly shaven upper lip.

Years later, when it was actually time to start shaving, I headed out to the local Rite Aid spent about $15 on a chrome Gillette. It wasn’t long before the cost of the razor was eclipsed by the cost of replacement blades.

A lot has changed since I bought my first Gillette. These days razors come packed with three to five blades, some vibrate, and others come with a single blade for close detail work. Despite the changes in form and function, there is one thing that hasn’t changed. The fancy razor is the cheap part of the package. Replacement razor blades are what really hurts your wallet.

Ever since my first visit to Calvaresi’s Barber Shop, I’ve been inspired to ditch the fancy razors and go back to basics. A Straight Razor, like my barber used, had the most appeal but I don’t know if I’m ready for one of those just yet.

What makes the most sense is a Safety Razor, just like the one I used as a kid. Sure, I’ll still have to buy blades but they are far less expensive than replacement heads. A quick search on Amazon turns up a variety of razors to choose from. The one I’m about sold on is the Merkur Double-Edge Safety Razor.

Setting myself up with the Merkur Safety Razor, a badger hair brush, blades, and soap isn’t exactly cheap but I’m guessing my money will go a whole lot further than if I were to continue with modern razors and shaving gels.


This is where you come in.
Guide me in the ways of selecting and using a Safety Razor.

Photo Credit: Andreas Knudsen | andreknu on Flickr